Selected Quotations from: The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra Essay

Selected Quotations from: The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra

There’s beggary in the love that can be reckon’d.    Mark Antony, Act I, Scene i

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Kingdoms are clay:                                                   Mark Antony, Act I, Scene i

You think none but your sheets are privy to your wishes. Alexas, Act I, Scene ii

O, then we bring forth weeds,

When our quick minds lie still;                                  Mark Antony, Act I, Scene ii

What our contempt doth often hurl from us,

We wish it ours again;                                                           Mark Antony, Act I, Scene ii

Why, then, we kill all our women:

we see how mortal an unkindness is to them;

if they suffer our departure, death’s the word.         Domitius Enobarbus, Act I, Scene ii

this grief is crowned

with consolation; your old smock brings forth a new

petticoat:                                                                    Domitius Enobarbus, Act I, Scene ii

In time we hate that which we often fear.                Charmian, Act I, Scene iii

The gods best know, –                                              Mark Antony, Act I, Scene iii

Why should I think you can be mine and true,         Cleopatra, Act I, Scene iii

We, ignorant of ourselves,

Beg often our own harms, which the wise powers

Deny us for our own good; so find we profit

By losing of our prayers.                                           Menecrates, Act II, Scene i

I know not, Menas,

How lesser enmities may give way to greater.          Pompey, Act II, Scene i

This was but as a fly by an eagle:                              Domitius Enobarbus, Act II, Scene ii

Give me some music; music, moody food

Of us that trade in love.                                            Cleopatra, Act II, Scene v

But there is never a fair woman has a true face.       Domitius Enobarbus, Act II, Scene vi

Better to leave undone, than by our deed

Acquire too high a fame when him we serve’s away.  Ventidius, Act III, Scene i

Caesar? Why, he’s the Jupiter of men.                      Domitius Enobarbus, Act III, Scene ii

Would you praise Caesar, say ‘Caesar:’ go no further.  Domitius Enobarbus, Act III, Scene ii

if I lose mine honour,

I lose myself:                                                             Mark Antony, Act III, Scene iv

I have eyes upon him,

And his affairs come to me on the wind.                  Octavius Caesar, Act III Scene vi

Celerity is never more admired

Than by the negligent.                                                          Cleopatra, Act III, Scene vii

women are not

In their best fortunes strong;                                     Octavius Caesar, Act III, Scene xii

tell him he wears the rose

Of youth upon him;                                                   Mark Antony, Act III, Scene xiii

The soul and body rive not more in parting

Than greatness going off.                                          Charmian, Act IV, Scene xiii

As water is in water.                                                 Mark Antony, Act IV, Scene xiv

Death of one person can be paid but once,               Mardian, Act IV, Scene xiv

I, that with my sword

Quarter’d the world, and o’er green Neptune’s back

With ships made cities, condemn myself to lack

The courage of a woman;                                          Mark Antony,  Act IV, Scene xiv

our size of sorrow,

Proportion’d to our cause, must be as great

As to which makes it.                                                Cleopatra, Act IV, Scene xv

Patience is scottish, and impatience does

Become a dog that’s mad:                                        Cleopatra, Act IV, Scene xv

the death of Antony

Is not a single doom; in the name lay

A moiety of the world.                                             Octavius Caesar, Act V, Scene i

Make not your thoughts be your prison:                   Octavius Caesar, Act V, Scene ii

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. “The Tragedy of Antony and Cleopatra.” 1998.  The Pennsylvania State University’s Electronic Classics Series.  May 30, 2010 <http://www2.hn.psu.edu/faculty/jmanis/shake.htm>

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